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YOUNG PEOPLE LIKE LIVING IN NORTH NORFOLK – BUT WORRY ABOUT GETTING THE GRADES, MONEY AND TRANSPORT

29th Mar 2015
John Archibald 1

Not getting the grades, money worries and transport issues – these are the main things holding back young people in the north of Norfolk from achieving their ambitions.  But more than three-quarters of them like living in the area.

These are two of the key conclusions from a major survey of 14-25 year olds carried out by Victory Housing Trust.  The affordable housing provider questioned more than 200 young people to find out their aspirations for the future, concerns they feel might hold them back, and what life is like for them living in their local area.

Other conclusions included:

  • Activities for young people, sports facilities and shops topped the list of most-wanted things which would improve life for young people in the area.
  • Young people have high aspirations and want to stay on in education.
  • Peace and quiet, rural countryside, being close to friends and knowing lots of people topped the list of why young people like living in the north of Norfolk; lack of transport and facilities topped the reason why some dislike living here.
  • The proportion who said they liked living in the north of Norfolk was similar in towns and more rural villages.
  • One in six young people who took part say they are living in a household which includes someone with a disability.
  • Over a third of those living in private rented accommodation had encountered difficulty in finding somewhere suitable to live.

“This is a fascinating snapshot of how young people feel about living in the north of the county,” said Victory chief executive John Archibald.  “It is encouraging that such a high proportion like living here – now we have to provide the opportunities, the infrastructure and the facilities to ensure they stay and prosper.

“Issues such as transport, housing, getting the right qualifications to build a career, and quality of life are just as relevant to young people as they are to everyone else.  These results will now help us shape a youth strategy that will ensure that Victory is investing in the needs of our young people.”

Victory undertook the survey to understand better the needs and aspirations of young people, as it is developing a youth strategy.  A total of 215 young people aged 14-25 completed the online survey, conducted between October 2014 and January 2015.